Adaptive Equipment Technician Judy Garber sits on the ground and works on a wheelchair.

What is your current role at skills?
Adaptive Equipment Technician

How long have you been with Skills, and what other roles have you had while you’ve been here?
38 years. I’ve worked as a DSP, PT Aide, filled in as a trans-disciplinary aide, maintained departmental budgets, trained new employees on passive therapeutic techniques (such as range-of-motion exercises, positioning, and transfers), and I’ve been a CPR and First Aid instructor.

How does your program help people overcome obstacles in their lives?
By acquiring equipment that makes mobility and accessibility easier, my work addresses comfort, encourages independence, and promotes health. The individuals usually enjoy trying new equipment, and it’s a good feeling when new equipment actually aides in improvement of their skills, and helps them to more fully enjoy their day-to-day activities.

How do you determine what type of support someone needs in order to best help them?
It really is a team effort (family, staff, therapists, vendors, and more). We look at how they live, what people are important to them, interests, comfort needs, medical concerns, and more. It’s hard to know how much further they could go if we could just hit that magical sweet spot.

It can be very rewarding or very frustrating because you want them to accomplish their goals, and to go out into the community and draw people in with their unique personalities. Their equipment and supports should reflect and enhance who they are and who they aspire to be.

What do you love about working at Skills?
I love the people, and by that I mean everyone. I enjoy the individuals, my coworkers, my bosses. I love the challenges, the learning, the lessons. It’s not always easy, but it’s rarely boring.

Want to work with people like Judy? Apply for a position with Skills.